There is No “I” in Team

A team is there for one another and soon a bond is created. With the right components and mindset from all the players, a team can be a family. A team is there for one another and soon a bond is created. With the right components and mindset from all the players, a team can be a family.

Many students at Leesville participate in afterschool programs. Whether it is a sport, theater or chorus, the same principle applies to all members: there is no “I” in team.

The definition of team is a group of people that come together to achieve a common goal. Together and common goal are two words that stick out. A team player doesn’t blame a mishap on one person because it is a team effort. A team player understands that in order to win or be successful, players must work together. Thinking of the team over anything else is what makes a group efficient.

Team bonding is important for a team. It is a time where everyone comes together and builds bridges. “We all [met] in a big circle and talked about the highs and lows in our lives. The experience [brought] us closer and made us aware of the different things we all go through,” said Erin Olivera, varsity women’s lacrosse player. Being with a group of people who all care for each other’s well being is liberating compared to the typical high school experience of selfishness. “We have had team sleepovers and dinners. When we get together, we can talk about whatever’s going on without judgement. It kinda reassures that everyone on the team is looking out for you,” said Anne Marie Cawley, varsity women’s soccer player.

“You can’t accomplish anything by yourself,” said Emma Librizzi, captain of the JV soccer team. Everyone on a team is working for a common goal and often people have different ideas on how to achieve it. To reach that goal, cooperation is key for a team. Tyler Stocum, captain of the JV baseball team, said, “Togetherness. Being competitive with each other, fighting for each other and playing for one another” is what being part of a team means.

Overall, to achieve the “togetherness” Stocum talked about, players must be willing to cooperate and take the time to get to know their new family. If players go in with an open mind, they might just come out with memories and a few lessons because there is no “I” in team.

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