Review of Get Out

“Their love is color-blind, but the world isn’t — and Chris is rightfully wary of how other people might react to seeing them together,” said Peter Debruge, Chief Film Critic of Variety Newspaper.  The iconic film Get Out, provides it viewers with a fierce political message hidden amongst it. (courtesy of Blumhouse Productions)“Their love is color-blind, but the world isn’t — and Chris is rightfully wary of how other people might react to seeing them together,” said Peter Debruge, Chief Film Critic of Variety Newspaper. The iconic film Get Out, provides it viewers with a fierce political message hidden amongst it. (courtesy of Blumhouse Productions)

In the film Get Out, Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) and his girlfriend, Rose (Allison Williams), have reached the “meet-the-parents” phase of their relationship. Taking that next step, Rose invites him to spend the weekend with her parents, Missy and Dean, in mid-town Alabama. In the beginning, Chris observes the family’s overly obliging behavior as an anxious attempt to adjust to their daughter’s interracial relationship with him. However, as their weekend progresses, he makes some disturbing discoveries that eventually lead him to a shocking truth and a hidden family secret.

According to IMDb, Get Out has a 8.3 rating and was originally released February 27. The film is one of the many popular Blumhouse Film Productions due to comedy and horror intertwining. Critics increased Get Out’s popularity even more by positively writing about the film and providing quotes that peaked the interest of possible viewers. “More than just a standard-issue thriller, this brutal, smart movie is impeccably made, as well as surprising, shocking, and funny, while also offering a compassionate, thoughtful look at race,” said Jeffrey M. Anderson, a critic from Common Sense Media Company.

I saw the movie and can definitely say that the film did live up to all the hype it was receiving. Get Out was equally entertaining and scary. The camera angles were positioned very well, adding suspense to scenes and setting bringing the movie to life.

Get Out has a way of drawing in the crowd and, in a way, bringing them together, fighting for the main character. There were scenes in the film where people around me literally started clapping in response in Chris’s determined actions. Get Out is labeled as a horror movie and it’s filled with very realistic scenes, showing just how scary reality can be.

Those qualities, in addition to the director’s fearlessness to illustrate them, are the contributing factors to Get Out’s box office success.

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