The Hard Workers of Our Country

Kristin Noga sits atop a mountain in Boone, North Carolina. It is a common tradition to travel to the mountains over Labor Day. Photo used with permission of Kristin Noga. Kristin Noga sits atop a mountain in Boone, North Carolina. It is a common tradition to travel to the mountains over Labor Day. Photo used with permission of Kristin Noga.

Labor Day fell on the fourth of September this year, giving Leesville students and teachers a break from the school year that had started the Monday before. Many were excited to have a three day weekend and took the time off to travel or just relax at home, but most don’t appreciate the real reason behind the break.

Labor Day is a legal holiday observed each year on the first Monday of September in honor of the workforce in the United States that has shaped the economy and constructed the country.

I think [celebrating Labor Day] is a great opportunity to have discussions about the history of labor in our country. It is something that is often overlooked in history curriculum and that’s a shame. The history of workers in our country is part of our collective history as a nation,” said Jeffrey Moran, a history teacher at Leesville.

The workers in the late 1800s spent a large portion of their days in factories and fields, building the current United States. As a result, Labor Day was created as a day of rest for the workforce. The strong economy, plethora of jobs, and the large amount of opportunities in America today are all because of the workers.

To commemorate the holiday, many indulge in barbecues, a vacation to the mountains or beach, and pool parties.

“I spent the day relaxing because I feel that it is very important to take the day off because…people work…a lot over the course of the year,” said Justin Hickland, a sophomore at Leesville.

In addition to spending the day unwinding, students use Labor Day to get back into the swing of school. Freshmen, such as Nick Cassetta, were especially appreciative of this opportunity.

“The start of high school was pretty stressful, so to take a day to catch up and prepare for the weeks ahead was great,” said Cassetta.

Although students were ecstatic about the extra day off, not all of the teachers shared the same sentiment.

It can be challenging because the beginning of the year is when teachers and students like to establish routines and the three-day weekend throws that off a bit. Regardless, adaptation is part of the job and I don’t feel that it has negatively affected my classes,” said Moran.

Despite the fact that there was a break early on in the school year, many teachers and students still feel that celebrating Labor Day is very important and that their achievements are vital to the growth of the United States. The holiday reminds all us to stop, relax once in a while, and appreciate all that our country has become.

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